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Peter J. McDonnell, MD
He is director of The Wilmer Eye Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and chief medical editor of Ophthalmology Times.
An ophthalmologist’s experience with tele-medicine
Not long ago, whilst on my way to work, I found myself listening to one of those call-in doctor radio programs. People gave their first names and then described some problem they, a family member, or a friend were experiencing. The all-knowing medical expert would then ask a few questions and steer the caller in a certain direction.
Are we ophthalmologists in the eye of the storm?
Are we ophthalmologists in the eye of the storm?
This meteorological phenomenon is considered to have given rise to one of the most commonly misused phrases in the English language. Some people think the phrase means that the situation is a tumultuous one, as when The Economist magazine reported: “French bank shares, which have been in the eye of the storm, recovered sharply (BNP Paribas was up 13% on the day while Societe Generale rose by 5%).”
How to choose a subspecialty in ophthalmology
Shub-ad loved ophthalmology, but was having trouble deciding on her subspecialty. She knew her wise chairman, Pay-Dro, would help her think through the options.
Ten-day workweek for ophthalmologists
I feel inspired to offer my own vision for the working future: the ten-day workweek for ophthalmologists.
Ophthalmology and death by poison
Ophthalmology and death by poison
My position is that murdering people with poison is a terrible thing, even if the victim is an annoying parent, mother-in-law, or department chair. It's morally wrong, plus the penalty would likely be severe (suspension of operating privileges or even being fired—unless, of course, you have tenure). Yet ophthalmologists certainly have the means to go around poisoning folks.
If you’re so smart, why aren’t you happy?
By just about anybody's definition of success, ophthalmologists are successful: intelligent, well-paid, able to make people’s lives better and held in high esteem by the public. Not to mention good-looking. So they must be happy—right? Not necessarily.
Unpopular science
Recently, I attended two public addresses. Neither of the speakers, I believe, are stupid. But neither (obviously) had a science background.
How long will you live?
If we make the presumption that we will stay reasonably healthy and cognitively intact but cannot live forever, what would be ideal would be to at least know how much time each of us has left upon this green earth.
Dopamine: My drug of choice
Dopamine: My drug of choice
For some time now, I find myself looking at my smartphone with a frequency that is frankly disconcerting. In committee meetings, lectures, sporting venues, social events, and other settings, my eyes and fingers find themselves gravitating to that little rectangular device. For some time now, I find myself looking at my smartphone with a frequency that is frankly disconcerting. In committee meetings, lectures, sporting venues, social events, and other settings, my eyes and fingers find themselves gravitating to that little rectangular device.

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