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Dianna E. Graves, COMT, BS Ed
Sometimes the answer may simply be a ‘stem failure'
There is nothing you can do to help a person modify his or her behavior, or to modify a clinic behavior, if the person simply does not see—or will not acknowledge—this behavior within himself or herself.
Due diligence can mean difference between good plan, bad plan
When developing a new plan for a medical practice, explore solutions and barriers from all possible angles (including an escape route) before implementing the endeavor.
4 secrets to sustaining success in your practice
When success starts coming your way, the last thing you should do is take your foot off the gas. You must push even harder if you want the success to be sustainable.
(Eavesdropping at a major medical meeting)
Pay attention to what staff members are thinking. Failure to do so may mean others will inadvertently hear about the issue at hand.
Adding accountability to the practice vocabulary
Accountability comes in many shapes and sizes in a medical clinic. One group of ophthalmic technicians learned a valuable lession in prioritizing to the patient, relates Dianna Graves.
Applying rules of engagement to real-life scenarios
Rules can serve as invaluable guidelines for the future, as they are lessons learned from experience.
Combatting unsolicited advice from your staff
Combatting unsolicited advice from your staff
Everyone has an opinion, but are clinic managers prepared to listen to what staff has to say? ponders Dianna Graves.
What the clinic handbook doesn’t cover
Beyond the official handbook, employees will also come with their own “rules of survival” that they expect the clinic to follow. Unfortunately, the practice will have no idea what the rules—or deviation of the rules—are until they occur.
Clinic staff often creates its own chaos through behavior
Managers can teach staff many skills but often the most difficult lesson for employees to learn is they need to be aware of the chaos they consciously or unconsciously create.
Running a perfect clinic
As staff members develop in new roles, managers should coach and counsel them in the direction where they are thinking and making decisions in a global manner, not an individual manner.

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