09-12-2017
Ophthalmology Times eReport
The 'intelligent' way to train staffPatient excellence training should focus more on how to build a human connection while entering data into a terminal than how to use the latest and greatest diagnostic equipment. People over the age of 35 are either looking for life balance (in the case of a Millennial) or that respect he or she had in the professional arena before retirement (in the case of Baby Boomers.)
ARMOR surveillance study update gives current insights on antibiotic resistance for clinical ocular isolatesThe most recent analyses of data from the ARMOR (Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular micRoorganisms) Surveillance Program can guide clinicians choosing antibiotic therapy for initial empiric therapy and infection prophylaxis. The information also reinforces the importance of prudent antibiotic prescribing to limit the development of bacterial resistance to existing options, according to Penny Asbell, MD.
Dr. Mali's top 5 stories in ophthalmology in 2017 (so far)So far, 2017 has been a very exciting year for both ophthalmology and healthcare as a whole. We still have a few months left for more excitement, so stay tuned!
New therapies needed for allergy symptoms, quality of lifeHalf of patients with ocular allergies report experiencing symptoms year-round. While nearly all of them take eye drops to treat their symptoms, the majority report limited or no effect from over-the-counter drops, according to a new survey. The results suggest that new treatment approaches would improve both symptoms and quality of life.
P.S. Use this cost-effective marketing tactic to increase end-of-year profitsWhen you do not have enough money or time, a well-worded post script can be your best friend. Whether you are the new doctor who doesn’t have a large database or the kind-hearted provider who accepts all those low-paying plans and really can’t afford the estimated 60 cents per unit cost of a fall postcard campaign, please consider adding a P.S. to emails and a red-ink P.S. to all patient-directed, routine postal pieces.