November 2017 Default Cover Image
The doctor’s doctorA few months into my residency, a patient and her husband came to see me in clinic. The history revealed they had already sought the opinions of two internationally acknowledged giants in the field of retinal disease, one of whom was a department chairman. The answers they received on those visits had differed somewhat, so they were now coming to get the tie-breaking third opinion. “Thank goodness they have no idea I am just a first-year resident,” I thought to myself.
Tear osmolarity: Dry eye's 'vital sign'Hyperosmolarity emerges as key mechanism in TFOS DEWS II pathophysiology report
Biologic products increase dry eye optionsMany new diagnostic tools are available for dry eye and ocular surface disease (OSD). Treatments for dry eye and OSD have mixed results, however, said Bennie H. Jeng, MD.
TFOS DEWS II report introduces new patient classification schemeJ. Daniel Nelson, MD, chair of The Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society Dry Eye Workshop II, highlights a new scheme for patient classification.
Four ocular surface health questions to consider before cataract surgeryA thorough investigation of ocular surface health and initiation of any necessary treatment is the first step toward successful cataract surgery.
New metrics, new therapies for dry eyeRecently, there has been a greater interest in metrics focused upon the impact of dry eye disease on everyday activities such as reading, driving, or use of various visual display devices. These efforts provide a “real-life” assessment of how dry eye disease impacts vision-related activities.
Surveying the artificial tear landscapePatients use artificial tears for different reasons and diverse conditions. While available products supplement tear production and provide relief, few distinctions between drops have been clearly established. Recent studies show that direct comparison of a new product to an older, established one and use of “real-world” metrics can be most useful to prescribers.
Intranasal neurostimulation yields positive results for dry eye diseaseThe first portable, external neurostimulator to be approved in eye care stimulates endogenous tear production without physical irritation. The device can dramatically reduce symptoms and may enable patients to stop use of some or all tear substitutes or medications, noted John Sheppard, MD, MMSc.