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    News on cataract surgery medications centers on intraocular preparations

    Phenylephrine-ketorolac combination and ‘dropless’ procedure top of mind

     

    Take home

    In terms of medication use in cataract surgery, ophthalmologists discussed the continued increasing use of the intracameral route for antibiotic administration to prevent endophthalmitis and the launch of the “Go Dropless” campaign.

     

     

    By Cheryl Guttman Krader; Reviewed by Randall J. Olson, MD, and Mark Packer, MD

    In 2014, ophthalmology saw the approval of one new medication for use in cataract surgery—the fixed combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3% (Omidria, Omeros) for intraoperative use by addition to the irrigation solution.

    Otherwise, the most noteworthy item in terms of medication use in cataract surgery is probably the continued increasing use of the intracameral route for antibiotic administration to prevent endophthalmitis and the launch of the “Go Dropless” campaign using products from specialty pharmaceutical company, Imprimis Pharmaceuticals.

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    Ophthalmology Times editorial advisory board members, Randall J. Olson, MD, and Mark Packer, MD, discussed these topics.

    Dr. Olson and Dr. Packer both observed that use of intracameral antibiotics for endophthalmitis prophylaxis is growing among American cataract surgeons. Dr. Olson said that more and more surgeons at his institution are using the intracameral route of antibiotic administration as their standard approach, and he predicted it would become the predominant technique in the United States if a reasonably priced, unit-dose antibiotic for intracameral use became available.

    While there is ongoing discussion about creating an easier pathway for gaining FDA approval of such a product, no changes appear imminent. Meanwhile, many surgeons remain wary about using intracameral antibiotics, and with good reason, Dr. Olson said.

    Noting that cases of TASS associated with use of intracameral antibiotics continue to occur, Dr. Olson cautioned surgeons using the technique to be careful.

    Cheryl Guttman Krader
    Cheryl Guttman Krader is a contributor to Dermatology Times, Ophthalmology Times, and Urology Times.

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