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Cataract & Refractive
Device restores vision to patient ...

An artificial vision device (MyEye, OrCam) has helped a blind veteran regain his independence, according to the charity ...

Single-use MIGS device demonstrates ...
Cataract surgery may raise diabetic ...
Low-dose ranibizumab effective for ...
Retina
Opportunities and challenges in the ...

As another year comes to an end, five members of Ophthalmology Times Europe’s Editorial Advisory Board reflect and share ...

Diagnosing and treating MacTel ...
Confocal scanner gives ...
Gene therapy trial launched for ...
Glaucoma
Managing glaucoma with OCTA

Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new imaging technique that has the potential to move rapidly into ...

Opportunities and challenges in the ...
Applying micropulse transscleral ...
Exploring safety, efficacy of ...

Latest Issue

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OTE Articles

Aldehyde dehydrogenase implicated in mucous membrane pemphigoidPreliminary studies suggest disulfiram could aid in the treatment of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP). Used topically, the drug may inhibit aldehyde deydrogenase (ALDH), which plays a key role in fibrosis, wrote JK Dart, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London.
Evidence weak for blue light-filtering IOLsOnly weak evidence supports the use of IOLs that filter visible blue light, researchers say. “On the basis of currently available evidence, one cannot advocate for the use of blue-light-filtering IOLs over UV-only filtering IOLs,” wroite X. Li, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland, and colleagues.
No sign of chloramphenicol resistance in bacterial conjunctivitisChloramphenicol remains effective against Gram-positive bacteria, the most common agent in bacterial conjunctivitis, researchers say.
Autoantibodies may serve as glaucoma biomarkersThe loss of autoantibodies may serve as useful biomarkers for glaucoma, according to Nadine von Thun Und Hohenstein-Blaul, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany, and colleagues.
Global diabetes epidemic must not become epidemic of blindnessThe global epidemic in type 2 diabetes mellitus is of unprecedented proportions. In absolute numbers, it probably exceeds any previous epidemic in the history of mankind. There are now more than 400 million people with diabetes in the world, and the number is projected to exceed 600 million by 2030.